The sexual attitude, intercourse and sexual behavior of unmarried unmarried youth in China

background

In recent years, more teenagers have been conducting premarital sex in China. However, only a few studies have explored the sexual attitudes and behaviors of young people who have lost school, which is crucial to the development of preventive intervention.

methods

This study used 2000-2002 in the suburbs of Shanghai comprehensive education project baseline survey data, describes the sexual attitudes among 1304 out-of-school youth, sexual problems communication mode and premarital sex. Multifactor logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the factors associated with premarital sex with adolescents.

The results of

The vast majority (60 per cent) of young people have a good attitude towards premarital sex. Men are more likely to have a good attitude than women. Young men usually don’t communicate with each other about sex, and a third of young women talk to their mothers about sex. Both men and women chose their friends as the most likely people to talk about sex. About 18% of young people reported having sex. A fifth of sexually active teens use contraceptives, and a quarter are already pregnant (or have a partner already). There was no gender difference in the frequency of premarital sex or contraceptive use. Multivariate analysis showed that age, culture, family structure, family discipline,

conclusion

A significant proportion of young people are engaged in risky sexual behavior. Communication and sexual negotiation skills should be implemented for this disadvantaged group to promote condom use prevention programmes.

background

Over the past two decades, China has experienced profound social changes related to economic reform. Attitudes to sex have changed rapidly, and premarital sex has been accepted by many young people [1, 2]. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have increased dramatically during this period [3], and heterosexual transmission has rapidly become the main route of HIV transmission in China. The rate of HIV infection in China rose from 5.5% in 1997 to 19.8% in 2003 [4]. It is estimated that half of the new HIV infections in China in 2005 were through unprotected sex [5].

Young people are particularly vulnerable to HIV. The United Nations estimates that about half of new HIV infections in the world are between the ages of 15 and 24. In China, more than 60 percent of people living with HIV are 15 to 29 years old [6]. Therefore, effective prevention of HIV/AIDS is crucial to the control of HIV/AIDS epidemics, and understanding the sexual attitudes and behaviors of young people is crucial to designing preventive interventions.

Previous studies have shown that out-of-school status is associated with a strong increase in sexual activity and sexual risk behavior [7, 8]. A study in Ethiopia reported that the proportion of young people who were out of school was higher than that of young people in schools and had unprotected sex [8]. In new south wales, the incidence of sexual misconduct has been high compared with the age matching cohort at school [9]. In the United States, young people in foreign schools are more likely to start having sex earlier, failing to use contraception and pregnancy [10, 12, 11,]. The behavior of young people who are out of school is higher than the behavior of young people in school, which increases the risk of sexually transmitted infections and HIV infection [13]. A recent comprehensive review showed that the risk and prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases among young americans peaked at this age [14].

It has been shown that the family background has a strong impact on the time of sexual activity. Living in single-parent families or step-parents and teenagers begins to have sex earlier than those in two-parent families [15, 16]. The relationship between the closed and connected parents, the parents of the sexes, and the adolescent relationships that are affecting the peer group have shown a delayed activity [17, 18]. Dating, especially early and stable dating, provides a background for many teens’ sexual experiences [19]. Previous studies have shown that adolescents’ attitudes towards sex affect adolescents’ sexual behavior, and a more tolerant attitude leads to early first sexual behavior [19, 20]. However, few studies have looked at factors related to premarital sex in China.

In China, little is known about the concept and behavior of young people who have lost school. Most studies of adolescent sexual behavior are conducted among high school and college students. These studies show that most young people accept premarital sex, and a growing number of young people are engaged in premarital sex [21, 22]. For example, a survey conducted in Beijing in 1989 showed that 13 percent of men and 6 percent of female college students had intercourse [23]. In contrast, a study conducted in Beijing in 1999 showed that 17 percent of male college students and 12 percent of female college students experienced premarital sex [24]. In addition, in a study of young women in Shanghai, 76 percent reported having sex and 27 percent stopped being pregnant [25].

In addition, few studies have explored the factors that influence the premarital sex of young Chinese. Therefore, this research use Shanghai community-based comprehensive education project baseline data, aimed at resolving the four main research questions: (a) outside the youth’s attitude to premarital sexual behavior and pregnancy, and their gender related knowledge level? (b) do men and women fail to communicate with their parents and peers about sexual relations? (c) how widespread is the prevalence of premarital sex and contraceptive methods in youth? (d) what are the factors that contribute to premarital sex outside school? This information is very important for policy makers and health educators, can target face AIDS/STD infection and increased risk of unplanned pregnancy out-of-school youth make effective and feasible intervention strategy.

methods

Research websites and participants

The study was conducted from May 2000 to January 2002 in two comparable towns on the outskirts of Shanghai. The initial study was a quasi-experimental design of double-arm education intervention. We have chosen two typical suburban towns and qualified health service providers with good planning networks to manage our research sites. The education program provides information about sexual health, contraception and HIV prevention for unmarried young people; It also includes dispensing free contraceptives in the town. Selection criteria have been described elsewhere [26].

In May 2000, unmarried young people aged 15 to 24 were willing to take part in the study. Family planning staff contact local authorities (such as schools, factories and community leaders) to make a list of all eligible youth and invite them to participate in the study. Initially, we invited 2362 eligible young (for example, 970 college students and 1392 out-of-school youth), 2227 youth (for example, 923 college students and 1304 out-of-school youth) agreed to participate in the study and complete the baseline survey. The analysis was based on data from a baseline survey of 1,304 young people (801 men and 503 women).

Investigation procedure

Participants initially determined by local family planning officials were invited to participate in the investigation. A structured questionnaire survey was conducted for all participants who provided written informed consent (with parental consent for adolescents under 18 years of age). The questionnaire was conducted among 30 unmarried young adults to determine whether the content and language of the study was appropriate. The survey was anonymous and conducted in a private environment, such as a community meeting room. Trained researchers provide explanations and guidance for completing surveys, and can help participants understand any problems they encounter in understanding the questionnaire. The investigators examined the completeness and consistency of all questionnaires. The answer to an open question is grouped according to the frequency of the occurrence, and then analyzed according to the specified class encoding. The research programme was approved by the world health organization’s scientific ethics review group for reproductive health and research.

Questionnaire to collect the participants’ gender, age, level of education, current occupation, family economic status (poverty, average, or rich), family structure, family long discipline (strictly, or generally relax), member of the family feelings, good and bad), dating status, sexual problems parents – youth exchange, attitude to premarital sexual behavior and pregnancy, premarital sex, contraception use, sexual coercion and participate in pregnancy. The survey also includes questions about sexual physiology, contraception, HIV/STD transmission, symptoms and prevention of knowledge. Due to the low frequency of some coping styles, parental discipline, education and occupational reactions were consolidated into 2,3, 4, 1) in statistical analysis.

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