Heat the frozen rolls on the hot car engine. Touring musician Sharon Martinson said it was frozen to hot in about 20 minutes.
Editor’s note: in the audio of the story, as in previous web versions, musician Jalan Crossland suggested using Altoids tin to make cakes and connect them to car batteries. Crossland now says he’s joking. Be clear: this should not be attempted. Connecting anything to a battery terminal other than the battery cable itself is dangerous: it can cause a fire and can cause damage to the vehicle or to the driver and passenger. Here are some better ideas.
For most of us, a road trip is a fun summer adventure – out of work for a period of time, at a gas station loud gurgling on junk food, listen to audio books and your favorite songs.
But driving on the road isn’t your vacation, it’s part of your life. If you do these things regularly, it’s not healthy or economical to eat fast food and sleep in a hotel.
Many musicians spend their lives on the road. Those who want to stay healthy and keep their wallets full have developed some trading skills.
Keep in mind that trying these methods requires you to take your own risk – we can’t prove its security.
Sharon martinson plays bass player rodgman. Martinson toured the country.
Banjo’s Sharon martinson has been driving across the United States for the past six years, acting as a bird. On the tour, Martinson records about 6,000 miles a month. For most of the years, she spent a lot of time traveling, just like she was at home.
Even on the road, she said she hardly ever lived in a hotel, and she never stopped eating fast food.
“If you’re sitting and driving a lot, you don’t need to eat,” she said. “Mostly because you’re bored and eating.”
But when the last bite arrived, Martinson filled the fridge with plenty of water and ice, fresh fruit and healthy snacks. Dry food is also key.
“I do have a whole bag of bags, just hot water,” she said, “because you can stop at a gas station and always have free hot water. There’s always a coffee station. There’s always a hot tap.
For example, in order to make oatmeal, she suggests using a container with an occlusal cover and keeping some handy cutlery.
You can even do some cooking with your car. A: engine cylinder head roll.
Before she left, Martinson made rolls, wrapped them in foil and stuffed them with ice. Later, when thawing them, she stopped and used a still warm engine.
Sharon martinson’s roll recipe.
“You’ve been driving, so you turn on the hood and find a position on the engine block, preferably with metal,” she said. “I might give it 20 minutes, from freezing to thawing, the cheese is good, it’s good, it’s delicious.”
Another engine module recipe comes from another Wyoming musician, Jalan Crossland, who spends most of his time behind the wheel.
Provide 4 bands
Ingredients:
1 box of aluminum foil
1 carat olive oil, or 10W / 30 oil.
48 ounces of cheap beer or wine.
1 pound of meat, beef or chicken (tofu is not acceptable)
1 potato
An onion
1 carrot
1 PKG cherry tomato.
You like the stew.
Preparation:
Tear off 4 pieces of foil, about.
2’x 2′ divides meat and vegetables into equal parts.
The meat and vegetables are combined on the foil square.
Add 1 tablespoon oil to each square to each square.
Add 1 cup of wine
Seasoning van
Wrap put foil around the ingredients.
The sheet is packed in aluminum foil on the engine intake manifold.
Check if meat is thoroughly cooked every 30 minutes (different motors are heated at different temperatures and require different cooking times)
Carefully unfold the foil wrapper and enjoy the rest of the wine.
First, wrap the potatoes, carrots, Onions and seasonings with aluminum foil. “Then you put it on the intake manifold on the motor, and after a while you have a fully cooked stew,” he explained.
Barbecue is not limited to musicians. There is a book dedicated to the process. And fans have video to show how to make everything from shrimp, potatoes to beans, steak and mushrooms.
If you have to replenish supplies, Sharon martinson recommends farmers markets.
“It’s a great way to see part of the community, eat seasonal fresh ingredients and mingle with people who are also in the farmers market,” she said.
Martinson and crossland are both going home for the night. They suggest not going to the hotel, but camping on public land, such as the national forest. But if there is no grass nearby, go to asphalt.
“The truck stopped, walmart,” he said. “Everyone knows that the place is where you’re going, and the half-idle rest makes you sleep well, and the smoke makes you stay that way.”
Suppose you wake up the next morning, take a scenic route, stop at a historic landmark, and embrace the open road.

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